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Archive for the ‘Photo’ Category

Milkyway

This photo, captured on Sep 06, 2007 from La Palma, shows also the Sagittarius and Scorpion constellations and the milky way. The open cluster M7 is clearly seen. The telescope in the background is the GTC telescope.

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Perseids meteor shower is one of the most famous meteor showers in the northern hemisphere. This photo, captured on Aug 24, 2007, shows two  meteors passing around constellation Auriga. While the lower meteor apparently is a Perseid meteor (since its path crosses the Perseids constellation, the meteor on the left looks like to be sporadic.  Constellation Taurus is seen on the top/right of the image. The photo is a single exposure with an exposure time of 30 seconds.

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Big dipper  or the Ursa major is one of the most famous constellation in the northern hemisphere.  The Polaris is at the lower right corner. The ursa minor constellation is also seen at the lower right. This photo, captured on July 05, 2009,  is a composite photo of 20 exposures (10 seconds each). As usual, I used a Canon EOS 400D camera without tracking. The reduction and processing was done using Iris.

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This spectacular photo shows Venus and Mars, as well as the Moon. In addition, the brightest star in the Spica constellation is also seen. The Teide mountain, which hosts the Observatorio del Teide, seen in the background. The above photo  is result of aligning and averaging six two second exposures. I used only a camera, a tripod and a cable release.

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Following  older posts on astrophotography  where I have shown Lyra and Andromeda, here I present Canis Major, the constellation of the brightest star in the sky, Sirius. The M41 open cluster is seen clearly in the image. It has 90 seconds of total exposure time, a focal length of 30mm, and opening of f/4.0. I used Iris to calibrate and merge the raw images. The original  image has a resolution of about 8 times better.

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In a seri of posts, I plan to show some of my simple astrophotos. Almost all of them were taken without any special equipment, e.g. telescope. I used only a camera, a tripod and a cable release. Using my  Canon EOS 400D camera, on Sep 2010, I have recorded  24 times 15 seconds exposure without tracking. Then, the raw images were merged in Deepskystacker. M31 and M33 are seen clearly at bottom and top, respectively, on the both sides of the Andromeda constellation. It simply shows that one does not need dedicated equipments for simple astrophotography.

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Green Flash

Green flashes and green rays are optical phenomena that occur shortly after sunset or before sunrise, when a green spot or rim is visible above the sun.  The reason is that for different part of the solar spectrum, i.e., different colors, there are different refraction index in the atmosphere. That means the earth atmosphere plays role of a prism. This phenomena is called the differential refraction.

The difference between the refraction index of green and red is very small. However, when the sun is very close to the horizon, the red and green beams are off by a few arc seconds. Certain atmospheric conditions can intensify this effect.

Green rim above the solar image seconds before the sunset.

In the above image, you see a green rim above the sun, seconds before the sunset.  It was captured with similar setup as I explained in a previous pots:  a Canon EOS 400D camera was attached to the Celestron Nexstar 4 inch Maksutov telescope in prime focus mode.

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